North Korean media warns of “unhealthy ideas” spread by mobile phones

SEOUL ( ) – North Korea’s main state newspaper warned on Tuesday of the “negative impact” from mobile phones use around the world, as both legal and illicit communications devices proliferate in the isolated country.

Rodong Sinmun published an article citing a ban on phones in classrooms in France and reports of technology-enabled cheating in India and argued that mobile devices were spreading “decadent and reactionary ideological culture”.

“Erotic notices, fictions and videos, as well as violent electronic games, are spreading through the mobile phones without limits,” the newspaper wrote.

“This means that mobile phones are used as tools to instill unhealthy ideas in minors.”

North Korea’s authoritarian government maintains a tight grip on communications, with almost no ordinary citizens allowed to connect by phone or internet to the outside world.

Still, since 20爱上海41908, the government has rolled out tightly controlled cell networks for communication within the country, with an estimated 3 million subscribers.

South Korean officials estimate that there are about 6 million mobile phones in North Korea, a country of 25 million people.

Analysts say there are signs that the government is slowly allowing more communications technology, even if it rema,上海龙凤1314 shlfLarissa,ins restricted to networks within North Korea.

According to a report on Dec. 3 by the 38 North website, which monitors North Korea, state media recently broadcast reports of the first outdoor Wi-Fi network in downtown Pyongyang.

Defectors who have left North Korea report that many people secretly watch foreign media, especially South Korean entertainment.

Several North Korea security agencies police communications devices, often randomly inspecting computers, phones, and other devices for banned foreign media or the capability to receive international signals, the U.S. State Department said in ,上海419对对碰Ida,a report on censorship and human rights in North Korea released last week.

“North Koreans caught with illicit entertainment items such as DVDs, CDs, and USBs are at a minimum sent to prison camps and, in extreme cases, may fa,上海龙凤shlf66Dallas,ce public execution,” the State Department said in the report.

Some North Koreans living along the border with China have turned to smuggled Chinese devices to make international calls, but human rights activists say North Koreans caught with illicit phones risk being sent to prison camps.

Shot in the back: the dangers of being an opposition candidate in…

NOAKHALI, Bangladesh ( ) – At a library inside a small district court in southeastern Bangladesh, barrister Mahabub Uddin Khokon stood up to take off his coat and scrunched his white shirt up to his shoulders to reveal a back covered in bandages over several shotgun pellet wounds. Settling back into an office chair, the 62-year-old smiled.

“You see, my fight is not against the Awami League. It’s not them I am running against,” he said, referring to Bangladesh’s ruling party. “It’s against the police, the Election Commission, and the entire government machinery.”

Khokon, who is contesting Sunday’s parliamentary election as a candidate for the main opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP), alleges he was shot on Dec. 15 by a senior police officer in Noakhali, a mostly-rural district in the country’s southeast. At the time he says he was out canvassing for votes along with hundreds of supporters, of whom about 40 were also injured.

“I thought the police was there to protect us,” said Khokon, who is also secretary of Bangladesh’s Supreme C,贵族宝贝mm自荐Kaiden,ourt Bar Association.

The top election official i,021上海贵族宝贝论坛Jace,n the area, who also oversees the police, has dismissed the allegations. Police, the government and the Awami League also deny opposition allegations of intimidation, and say the election campaign period has been fair.

While violence during election campaigns is not new in the South Asian nation, the attack on Khokon and his supporters has fed into the opposition accusations.

Sprawling paddy fields and coconut trees flank narrow roads in Noakhali’s Sonaimuri, about 100 miles (160 km) south of Dhaka, where Khokon is contesting.

The town was the scene of bloody violence on Dec. 15.

“The (police) officer-in-charge asked Khokon to leave the place immediately and then abruptly fired pellet bullets at the petitioner (Khokon),” said a lawsuit Khokon has filed at the Dhaka High Court against specific police officers, the government and the election commission.

One pellet hit Khokon’s chin, five his back and two his legs, the suit alleges, adding that 40 other opposition activists were also “grievously injured by illegal and unjustified firing of bullets by police” in that attack.

Tanmoy Das, the returning officer in charge of overseeing elections and police in Noakhali, said Khokon had made exaggerated claims and it was not the police but others, perhaps people from Khokon’s own party, who shot at him because of internal d上海龙凤419iscord. H. M. Ibrahim, the Awami League candidate Khokon is running against, echoed those statements.

“Some violence is usual in our politics,” Ibrahim said, adding that Khokon’s supporters had attacked an Awami League office on the same day and in the same area that Khokon was attacked. “He is a lawyer, he is trying to make a fool of the public. His own party people must have fired at him.”

Das said an investigation was un,爱上海同城交流论坛Falkner,derway, and the police officer in charge in Sonaimuri had been “replaced” on orders of the Election Commission “due to pressure.” He declined to say who the pressure was from.

“I think the situation is good here. There is a level-playing field,” Das said, adding that he had received no complaints of Awami League workers threatening or attacking anyone.